Events

Hit the Road

Event Picture
05/22/2022
Date: May 20 - Jun 2
Venue: Mary Riepma Ross Media Arts Center
Location: 313 N. 13th Street
Ticket Price: See website for ticket information
Time: Showtimes for the upcoming week are published on Tuesdays. Please check back for additional times as they are added.
Website: www.TheRoss.org
Phone: (402) 472-5353

A beautifully acted drama with steadily cumulative force, opening at The Ross on Friday, May 20, HIT THE ROAD uses one family's journey to make trenchant observations about society as a whole. “HIT THE ROAD” is at its best when simultaneously operating in two different gears. –David Ehrlich, indieWire Its 93 minutes whip by so airily, it's possible not to realize how much you've learned to love the family whose road trip you've shared in, until the credits roll and you immediately start to miss them. –Jessica Kiang, Variety - Crackling with energy and outbreaks of exuberant lip syncing, riotously funny at times and quietly devastating at others. –Wendy Ide, Screen International HIT THE ROAD is showing at the Mary Riepma Ross Media Arts Center on Friday, May 20 through Thursday, June 2. Show times are available at www.TheRoss.org, by consulting your newspaper, or by calling the MRRMAC film information line at 402.472.5353. Panah Panahi, son and collaborator of embattled Iranian master Jafar Panahi, makes a striking feature debut with this charming, sharp-witted, and deeply moving comic drama. HIT THE ROAD takes the tradition of the Iranian road-trip movie and adds unexpected twists and turns. It follows a family of four – two middle-aged parents and their sons, one a taciturn adult, the other an ebullient six-year-old – as they drive across the Iranian countryside. Over the course of the trip, they bond over memories of the past, grapple with fears of the unknown, and fuss over their sick dog. Unspoken tensions arise and the film builds emotional momentum as it slowly reveals the furtive purpose for their journey. The result is a humanist drama that offers an authentic, raw, and deeply sincere observation of an Iranian family preparing to part with one of their own.