Events

LUX Center for the Arts presents Ship to Shore

Event Picture
03/25/2020
Date: Jan 9 - May 5
Venue: LUX Center for the Arts
Location: 2601 N 48th St.
Ticket Price: Free
Time: Open by appointment
Website: luxcenter.org
Phone: (402) 466-8692

Some say water is the easiest art subject to depict. This is asserted because the information is repetitive and when you learn the structure of a wave or can represent the surface of water, you may create many variances of them in different settings. But as we all are aware, knowing art concepts intellectually does not impart the skill of an artist into our hands. Depicting the variations of depth, surface, splashing droplets, crashing waves, eddies, hues, and reflections of water is extremely challenging for artists. Artwork focusing on water, coastline views, or seas were only occasionally created in antiquity. During the Renaissance, religious and mythological portrayals based on sea stories became popular. Later with the rise of naval military fleets, warfare between battleships became a common sea-based theme for artists. The term “seascape” to refer to water depictions was not used until approximately 1790. The word was meant to be a direct comparison or contrast to “landscape” images which are scenes of land although bodies of water are sometimes included. Eventually, water themed artwork became more varied and artists no longer used ocean views solely to render battles or myths. Instead, seascapes became an eloquent subject to express a variety of emotions. For example, during the 20th Century, many artists focused on the tranquility of the water rather than its turbulence. Whatever the artist’s intent, it is difficult not to feel stirred by the power of seascapes and water-based images. The vastness of oceans expands our horizon and a flowing brook captivates our interest. A calm water surface soothes our mind while a scene of crashing waves sets our pulses racing. The artists who portray the many moods of water never fail to earn our appreciation. SHIP TO SHORE, an exhibition of seventeen seascape prints, was organized by Susan Soriente, Curator of the Lux Print Collection.