Events

Keep the Change

Event Picture
05/16/2018
Date: May 11 - May 17
Venue: Mary Riepma Ross Media Arts Center
Location: 313 N. 13th Street
Time: Showtimes for the upcoming week are published on Tuesdays. Please check back for additional times as they are added.
Website: www.TheRoss.org
Phone: (402) 472-5353

Opening at The Ross on Friday, May 11, KEEP THE CHANGE is a landmark motion picture — a movie about people living with autism in which all of the characters who have autism are portrayed by nonprofessional performers who also have autism. Romantic comedies are always looking to reinvent themselves, and Rachel Israel's debut feature, KEEP THE CHANGE, arrives as a fresh iteration that still calls back to the genre's Nora Ephron-wave classics. –Kristen Yoonsoo Kim, Village Voice A modest but refreshing love story that takes its autistic protagonists on their own terms. –John Defore, The Hollywood Reporter “KEEP THE CHANGE” is not a seamlessly crafted movie, but it's awfully tenderhearted and thoroughly disarming. It deserves to be widely seen. –Glenn Kenny, The New York Times KEEP THE CHANGE is showing at the Mary Riepma Ross Media Arts Center on Friday, May 11 through Thursday, May 17. Show times are available at www.TheRoss.org, by consulting your newspaper, or by calling the MRRMAC film information line at 402.472.5353. This program is being presented with the support of the Nebraska Arts Council and the Nebraska Cultural Endowment. When aspiring filmmaker David (Brandon Polansky) is mandated by a judge to attend a social program at the Jewish Community Center, he is sure of one thing: he doesn’t belong there. But when he’s assigned to visit the Brooklyn Bridge with the vivacious Sarah (Samantha Elisofon), sparks fly and his convictions are tested. Their budding relationship must weather Sarah’s romantic past, David’s judgmental mother (Jessica Walter), and their own pre-conceptions of what love is supposed to look like. Under the guise of an off-kilter New York romantic comedy, KEEP THE CHANGE does something quite radical in offering a refreshingly honest portrait of a community seldom depicted on the big screen. Rarely has a romcom felt so deep and poignant. Thoroughly charming and quite funny, the film's warmth and candor brings growth and transformation to the characters, and ultimately, to us.